English Idioms with meanings and examples PDF

English Idioms Explained PDF

The link to download the PDF on idioms is at the bottom of the page.

  1. Colour Idioms

  2. Idioms about Time

  3. Idioms to Express Happiness

  4. Idioms about Personality/Personal Characters

  5. Business/Work Place Idioms

  6. Idioms about People in Businesses/Corporation

  7. Idioms about Men

  8. Idioms about Appearance

  9. Idioms about Relationships

  10. Idioms about Family

  11. Idioms with the word ‘Down’

  12. Animal Idioms

  13. Cat Idioms

  14. Idioms about Sports

  15. Idioms about Expressing Emotions

  16. Food Idioms

  17. Idioms Course

Idioms with All

1-

Idiom: All ears

Meaning: listening, paying attention

Example:

Person 1: Are you listening?

Person 2: Yes, I’m all ears!

2-

Idiom: All eyes on me/ all eyes on him/all eyes on _____

Meaning: everyone looking/waiting to hear something

Example:

-All eyes on where on the mayor, as she begin her speech about the new housing project.

-All eyes were on the stage while the dancers performed.

3-

Idiom: All hell broke loose

Meaning: chaos

Example:

All hell broke loose when the fire alarm went off; people where running everywhere.

The riots in Baltimore caused all hell to break loose in the centre of the city.

4-

Idiom: All in a day’s work

Meaning: No big deal, simple

Example:

Person 1: Thanks for helping me move.

Person 2: It’s all in a day’s work.

5-

Idiom: All your eggs in one basket

Meaning: Don’t risk/put/gamble all your assets in one place or on one thing

Example:

Person 1: I’m going to bet all my money on the New York Yankees.

Person 2: Don’t put all your eggs in one basket.

6-

Idiom: All in your head

Meaning: you are imagining something, making a big deal about something that shouldn’t be

Example: Don’t worry about this. It’s all in your head.

7-

Idiom: All over the map

Meaning: Random, Hard to follow, incomprehensible

Examples:

-That video was all over the map.

-Professor Johnson’s lecture was all over the map.

8-

Idiom: all’s well that ends well

Meaning: earlier problems don’t matter because of a happy ending or outcome

Example:

-Even though the meeting had a slow start, eventually people started having a good time and dancing- all’s well that ends well.

9-

Idiom: go all out

Meaning: put all of your energy into something; do something enthusiastically

Example:

-Veronica went all out on the Halloween party. She had a costume contest, games and even a haunted house.

-You have to go all out to win the race.

Colour Idioms

1-

Idiom: blue collared worker

Meaning: works in a factory or hard labour job

Example:

-My dad is a blue collared worker. He has worked for Ford Motors for 34 years.

-The restaurant is full of blue collared workers because it is near three factories.

2-

Idiom: give the green light

Meaning: give permission

Example:

-My boss gave me the green light to submit the report to our client.

-After proofreading his work, she gave the green light to go ahead with the project.

3-

Idiom: once in a blue moon

Meaning: very rarely, not very often

Example:

-I like to go salsa dancing once in a blue moon.

-Albert visits his aunt once in a blue moon.

4-

Idiom: paint the town red

Meaning: have a great time

Example:

They painted the town red last night at the bachelorette party.

We are going to paint the town red tonight, because I am turning 21 years old!

5-

Idiom: see things in black and white

Meaning: no middle ground, only two possible ways

Example:

-My husband only sees things in black and white. He is never willing to see things in other people’s eyes.

- She is so stubborn. She only see things in black and white.

6-

Idiom: See through rose-coloured glasses

Meaning: very optimistic, very positive

Example:

-My sister sees the world through rose-coloured glasses. She thinks everything is perfect.

-He looked at the world through rose-coloured glasses.

7-

Idiom: tickled pink

Meaning: very happy

Example:

I was tickled pink when I received flowers at the office from my husband.

She was tickled pink when she received a big raise at her job.

8-

Idiom: white collared worker

Meaning: works in an office

Example:

-I don’t want to be a white collared worker all my life. Working in a cubicle drives me insane.

-The white collared workers poured out of the office building at 5:01pm.

9- Idiom: with flying colours

Meaning: did very well

-Wilmer passed his math exam with flying colours.

-Sofia studied very hard and passed the university entrance exam with flying colours.

Idioms about Time

1-

Idiom: Around the corner

Meaning: coming up; soon

Examples:

- Halloween is just around the corner.

-I can’t believe that Christmas is just around the corner.

2-

Idiom: crack of dawn

Meaning: very early in the morning

Examples:

-Willy has to wake up at the crack of dawn to get to work on time.

-Megan woke up at the crack of dawn in order to catch her flight to Italy.

3-

Idiom: at the eleventh hour

Meaning: at the last minute, when there is little time left

Example:

-The New York Yankees won the World Series at the eleventh hour.

- He bought the concert tickets at the eleventh hour.

4-

Idiom: in a flash

Meaning: very quickly; immediately.

Example:

-Ellen ran outside in a flash when she heard the explosion.

-The bird died in a flash after flying into the window.

5-

Idiom: in a heartbeat

Meaning: instantly; immediately

Examples:

-The final inning of the baseball game was over in a heartbeat.

- He accepted the new job in a heartbeat.

6-

Idiom: in the nick of time

Meaning: just in time; to do something in just enough time to be successful

Examples:

-The woman was saved by a doctor just in the nick of time.

- The man got out of the way of the train just in the nick of time.

7- Idiom: lose track of time

Meaning: forgot about time; forgot/ got distracted about the time

Examples:

-I’m sorry I’m late. I lost track of time.

-I always lose track of time when I am playing video games.

8-

Idiom: a mile a minute

Meaning: very quickly

Examples:

-Amelie talks a mile a minute.

-The tour guide talked a mile a minute. I barely understood what he said.

9-

Idiom: kill time/time to kill

Meaning: use time up; spend time aimlessly or without purpose

Examples:

-I have to kill time before my next flight in two hours.

-I had time to kill before my dinner date; so I decided to go shopping.

10-

Idiom: time heals all wounds

Meaning: things get better with time

Example:

-Shelly is very upset because her husband cheated on her –time heals all wounds.

Idioms to Express Happiness

1-

Idiom: On cloud nine

Meaning: you are on the top of the world, you feel wonderful

Examples:

-I was on cloud nine after I my daughter was born.

-Jeffrey was on cloud nine after he won the lottery.

2-

Idiom: Over the moon

Meaning: feel great, feel on top of the world

Examples:

-Amy was over the moon when she got engaged.

-My little sister was over the moon when she got a tablet for her birthday.

3-

Idiom: happy camper

Meaning: really happy

Examples:

-Tony was a happy camper when he got to leave work early.

-Kendall was a happy camper when the meeting was cancelled.

4-

Idiom: in seventh heaven

Meaning: really happy

Examples:

-I was in seventh heaven after eating chocolate cheesecake for dessert.

-She was in seventh heaven when she found out she was pregnant.

5-

Idiom: jump for joy

Meaning: be really happy/excited

Examples:

-She jumped for joy when completed the triathlon.

-He jumped for joy when he won $5,000 in the lottery.

Idioms about Personality/Personal Characters

1-

Idiom: behind the times

Meaning: old-fashioned, does not want to change

Examples:

- My uncle is behind the times, he still uses a cell phone the size of a brick.

- The hotel room was behind the times. It didn’t have a flat screen TV or air-conditioning.

2-

Idiom: busybody

Meaning: a person who meddles or pries in other people’s business or problems

Examples:

- Julie is a busybody. She is always asking a lot of questions and gossiping about others.

- My elderly neighbour is a busybody. I avoid talking to her at all costs.

3-

Idiom: cheapskate

Meaning: does not like to speak money, very frugal or stingy

Examples:

- My aunt Carla would rather go hungry than buy lunch at a restaurant. She is such a cheapskate.

- My dad has been wearing the same clothes since the 70’s. He is such a cheapskate. He would rather wear outdated clothes than spend $20 on a new shirt.

4-

Idiom: down to earth

Meaning: humble, easy going, practical, polite

Examples:

- Erica is a down to earth person. She has never been high maintenance like her sister.

- Jackson has been my friend since fourth grade. He is such a down to earth person and is easy to talk to.

5-

Idiom: go-getter

Meaning: ambitious

Examples:

- My brother is a go-getter; he had a multimillion dollar company by the age of thirty.

- The successful entrepreneur has been a go-getter since he started his business ten years ago.

6-

Idiom: know it all

Meaning: someone who thinks they know everything

Examples:

- My uncle is such a know it all; he thinks he knows everything.

- My six year daughter is a know it all. She thinks she knows everything even when proved wrong.

7-

Idiom: party pooper

Meaning: some who has a negative attitude or actions

Examples:

- Melisa is such a party pooper. She is always complains about everything.

- I hate spending time with Teresa. She is such a party pooper. Everything that comes out of her mouth is negative.

8-

Idiom: set in ones ways

Meaning: someone who is stubborn or does not like change

Examples:

- My grandma is set in her ways. She still doesn’t think that computers are necessary.

- My grandfather is set in his ways. He thinks that women should do all the cooking and cleaning around the house.

9-

Idiom: social butterfly

Meaning: a person that knows a lot of people, someone that socializes with many people or groups

Examples:

- Missy has been a social butterfly since she was a little kid. She knows tons of people.

- Social butterflies are great people to be friends with. They can always introduce you to someone new.

10-

Idiom: worrywart

Meaning: someone who worries about everything, someone who is very anxious

Examples:

- I have been a worrywart all of my life. Everything makes me anxious.

- Mr. Phillips was such a worrywart. He always thought something bad was going to happen; though nothing ever did.

11-

Idiom: slime ball

Meaning: horrible, disputing

Examples:

-That professional basketball player is such a slime ball. He has ten kids with different women and doesn’t support any of them.

-My Uncle Sam is such a slime ball. He is always hitting on women young enough to be his daughter.

12-

Idiom: arm chair critic

Meaning: someone who is very critical, says negative comments about everything but does nothing about it

Example:

-My friend is such an arm chair critic. She is always complaining about the cost of her rent but never tries to find a cheaper place to live.

13-

Idiom: has a heart of gold

Meaning: friendly, sincere, generous

Examples:

-My aunt has a heart of gold. She volunteers three times a week at a homeless shelter.

-She is so nice. She must have a heart of gold.

Business/Work Place Idioms

1-

Idiom: face the facts

Meaning: accept reality; deal the truth (usually negative)

Examples:

-You have to face the facts. If this company doesn’t start earning money soon; we will have to go bankrupt.

-If you don’t face the facts, you are going to lose this account for the company.

2-

Idiom: Go back to the drawing board

Meaning: start over again

Examples:

-We had to go back to the drawing board after the client rejected the initial design of the website.

- The marketing team had to go back to the drawing board after their first campaign failed.

3-

Idiom: head the team

Meaning: in charge of, the boss, lead a group

Examples:

-Marcela is going to head the team in the new marketing campaign.

- Oscar heads the team in accounting.

4-

Idiom: get tied up

Meaning: get stuck in

Examples:

-I got tied up on a conference call for two hours.

-Marcos got tied up in the marketing department all afternoon.

5-

Idiom: footing the bill

Meaning: pay for

Examples:

-Who is going to foot the bill for this mistake; us or the client?

-Whoever is footing the bill for this retreat must be rich.

6-

Idiom: have an eye for (something)

Meaning: the ability to do something well

Examples:

- Tiffany has an eye for design.

- Pedro has had an eye for details since he started working here five years ago.

7-

Idiom: in over your head

Meaning: have too much to do, have too much responsibility/ability

Examples:

-She is in over her head with the new account. She has so much to do and will never finish.

-I knew he was in over his head when he missed the big deadline.

8-

Idiom: to axe someone

Meaning: to fire someone, to get terminated from your job/position

Examples:

- Willy got axed from job after he got his an argument with his co-worker.

- Rob was axed after they found out he was stealing money from the company.

9-

Idiom: back to the grind

Meaning: get back to work/routine

Examples:

- I’ve got to get back to the grind after the long weekend. I’m sure there is a lot of work piled up.

- I’ve been lazy lately. I better get back to the grind before I get fired.

10-

Idiom: desk jockey

Meaning: stuck at desk or stuck at computer all day long

Examples:

-I hate being a desk jockey. I wish I had a job where I got to get out of the office.

- She has been a desk jockey since she was 21. That’s why she can’t understand why I want to work in a different field.

11-

Idiom: pick up the slack

Meaning: do work that other aren’t doing/won’t do

Examples:

-Alex always works late. He has to pick up the slack of his lazy co-workers.

-Maria had to pick up the slack because one of her co-workers quit.

12-

Idiom: go with the flow

Meaning: go along with whatever happens; go along as things change

Examples:

- You have to be able to go with the flow in this position. No day is ever the same.

- She doesn’t like to go with the flow. She likes to be in charge of everything and doesn’t like it when things change.

13-

Idiom: (to) dot your i’s and cross your t’s

Meaning: to be very detail oriented; to be very careful

Examples:

- You have to dot your i’s and cross your t’s when you work with the Schultz Brothers.

They always find peoples mistakes.

- If you don’t dot your i’s and cross your t’s on this contract; there might be legal repercussions.

14-

Idiom: bite off more than one can chew

Meaning: take on too much; try to do too much

Examples:

-She bit off more than she can chew when she agreed to write the entire 100 page report by Friday.

-He bit off more than he can chew when he said he would compile all of the findings in a report by next week.

Idioms about People in Businesses/Corporation

1-

Idiom: Mover and Shaker

Meaning: a powerful person who goes to many events and influences and meets many people

Examples:

-The owner of Samsung is a mover and shaker. He convinces people to buy his new designs and support his new projects even before they are developed.

-The head of public relations is a mover and a shaker. She knows how to get free publicity and a ton of people to show up at events just by making a few phones calls.

2-

Idiom: Big Fish in a little pond

Meaning: a person who is over qualified and has lots of skills or education but works for a small company or business

Example:

-Even though Dr. Martin is renowned for his work in heart surgery; he prefers to work at a small clinic than in a huge hospital in the city. Dr. Martin is a big fish in a little pond.

3-

Idiom: Big Cheese

Meaning: the most important person in a business/organization,

Examples:

-Bill Gates is the big cheese of Microsoft.

-My cousin thinks he is the big cheese of his company but he is only mid-level management.

4-

Idiom: people person

Meaning: a person who enjoys or is very good at interacting with others.

Examples:

-Marcie has been a people person since she was a young girl. She is a true extrovert and will talk to anyone she meets.

-I’m not really a people person. I’d rather keep to myself than have to talk to everyone I see.

5-

Idiom: the head honcho

Meaning: the most important person in a business/organization

Examples:

-My sister is the head honcho of the Museum of Modern Art in Miami.

-My friend will soon be the head honcho of social media company in New York.

Idioms about Men

1-

Idiom: a man of few words

Meaning: quiet man

Examples:

-My grandfather is a man of few words.

-Eric is a man of few words. He never talks a lot unless he disapproved of something; than he would let us know.

2-

Idiom: a man of his word

Meaning: someone who keeps their promise; does what they say they are going to do

Examples:

-You can trust him. He is a man of his word.

- Mr. Jenkins is a man of his word. I have known him for 25 years and he always does what he says he is going to.

3-

Idiom: a ladies man

Meaning: a man that loves spending time and flirting with women

Examples:

- You better watch out. Calvin is a ladies man. He never commits to one woman for very long.

- Jeff is a ladies man. The girls are always throwing themselves at him at bars and clubs.

4-

Idiom: a man of the people

Meaning: understand of need, views of the ordinary people

Examples:

-Congressman Field is a man of the people. He always listens to what his constituents want and need.

- Pastor Swanson is a man of the people. He spends most of his time helping ordinary people do better in life.

5-

Idiom: man of the hour

Meaning: someone who is receiving a lot of attention right now

Example:

-Here he is; the man of the hour. Let’s toast to his new business venture.

6-

Idiom: family man

Meaning: a man that likes to spend time and is dedicated to his family

Examples:

-Jason is a family man. He loves spending time with his three kids and wife.

-I’m not sure why he has so many kids. He is not a family man at all. He barely ever sees his kids.

7-

Idiom: sugar daddy

Meaning: a wealthy (rich) older man who gives gifts to young women in return for their company or sexual favours

Examples:

- Geraldine’s sugar daddy bought her a new car after their last date.

- Marisa loves having a sugar daddy. Whenever she goes out with him, he buys her lots of expensive clothes and shoes that she would never be able to afford.

Idioms about Appearance

1-

Idiom: not a hair out of place

Meaning: perfect appearance; to look perfect

Examples:

-Nathan always looks great- not a hair out of place.

2-

Idiom: Dressed to Kill

Meaning: wearing beautiful clothes in order to create a stunning impression

Examples:

-Charlotte was dressed to kill. Everyone at the ball couldn’t keep their eyes off her.

-Christina appeared at the party in a beautiful blue gown. She was dressed to kill.

3-

Idiom: decked out

Meaning: dressed up; dressed in very nice clothes

Examples:

-Marta got all decked out for the Holiday Party at work.

-Petra got decked out for her first date with the doctor.

4-

Idiom: pretty as a picture

Meaning: very pretty; very beautiful

Examples:

- Josie was as pretty as a picture.

-After Fernanda got her hair and makeup done; she was pretty as a picture.

Idioms about Relationships

1-

Idiom: be an item

Meaning: to be dating; to be a couple in a romantic relationship

Examples:

-Joel and Cindy are an item; it only took two long years for them to officially start dating.

- Sean and Megan are an item. They finally made it official.

2-

Idiom: get hitched/tie the knot

Meaning: get married

Examples:

-Sam and Georgia got hitched in Las Vegas.

-Eric and Sara tied the knot last week.

3-

Idiom: cold feet

Meaning: loss of nerve; no confidence; scared (to do something)

Examples:

-Kyle had cold feet. He wanted to ask Lucia out on a date but he thought she would say no.

-He started to get cold feet on his wedding day.

4-

Idiom: butterflies in my stomach

Meaning: to be anxious or nervous about something

Examples:

-She gets butterflies in her stomach every time he calls.

-I got butterflies in my stomach before our first date.

5-

Idiom: head over heels

Meaning: madly/really in love

Examples:

-I fell head over heels for Matt the first time I met him.

-Emily fell head over heels for Santiago.

6-

Idiom: have the hots for

Meaning: to like someone; to be attracted to someone

Examples:

-Charlie has the hots for Sarah.

-Mitch has had the hots for Stephanie since they were fifteen years old.

7-

Idiom: have a crush on someone

Meaning: to secretly like someone; to secretly be attracted to someone

Examples:

-I have had a crush on my neighbour Tony since I was six years old. He is so cute.

-Little Jimmy has a crush on his first grade teacher. He never stops talking about how great she is.

8-

Idiom: catch someone’s eye

Meaning: attract someone's attention by making eye contact with them; be noticed by someone

Examples:

-He tried to catch her eye from the other side of the bar.

-Her stunning looks caught my eye.

9-

Idiom: puppy love

Meaning: intense but relatively superficial romantic attachment usually associated with teenagers

Examples:

-Antonia and Alex are such a cute couple. It’s like puppy love how they are together all the time.

-Gabrielle and Mason can’t get enough of each other. I hope this puppy love lasts.

Idioms about Family

1-

Idiom: black sheep of the family

Meaning: worst member of the family; outcast of the family

Examples:

-William is the black sheep of the family. He has never fit in.

-She is the black sheep of the family. She never went to university and barely ever works.

2-

Idiom: run in the family

Meaning: a characteristic that many members of the family have

Examples:

-Big noses run in the family.

- Even though cancer runs in the family doesn’t mean that you will have it.

3-

Idiom: your own flesh and blood

Meaning: a member of the family

Examples:

-You should be nicer to your brother. He is your own flesh and blood.

- I think your step-dad forgets you are part of the family. You are their own flesh and blood.

4-

Idiom: bad blood

Meaning: feeling of hate or strong dislike between people because of any arguments or problems in the past

Examples:

-There has been bad blood between Richard and Natalie ever since he broke up with her.

-There is bad blood between my grandfather and his new neighbour. They are always getting into arguments because his neighbour lets his dog poop all over my Grandpa’s yard.

5-

Idiom: blood is thicker than water

Meaning: family relationships are the strongest and most important ones; be loyal to your family

Examples:

-John’s wife doesn’t like his brother. John better remember that blood is thicker than water.

-She better remember that blood is thicker than water. She thinks her friends have good intentions but they are really pulling her away from her family.

6-

Idiom: a chip off the old block

Meaning: similar to father/mother

Examples:

-Peter is really a chip off the old block. He looks just like his father did when he was a young man.

-Sophia talks, walks and dressers just like her mom. She is chip off the old block.

7-

Idiom: like father, like son/ like mother, like daughter

Meaning: do something the same as parent

Example:

-Jacob decided to join the military- like father, like son.

-Carla got into acting- like mother, like daughter.

8-

Idiom: fly the coop/nest

Meaning: child leaves the family home and lives elsewhere

Examples:

-Jimmy flew the coop when he turned 18 years old.

-Betsy flew the nest as soon as she accepted a full time job in the city.

9-

Idiom: empty nesters

Meaning: adult children moved about and parents are now living alone

Examples:

-My parents were so excited to be empty nesters.

-My parents don’t like being empty nesters. They are thinking about getting a foreign exchange student to live with them.

Idioms with the word ‘Down’

1-

Idiom: down in the dumps

Meaning: feels really bad, depressed

Examples:

-Mabel was down in the dumps after she lost her job.

-Willy has been down in the dumps since he found out he failed his Physics exam.

2-

Idiom: down to the wire

Meaning: until the last moment or second

Examples:

-The World Cup game came down to the wire before Brazil won in the last minute.

- The basketball game came down to the wire until Michael Jordan made a 3-pointer in the last five seconds of the game.

3-

Idiom: down the drain

Meaning: lost forever, gone, wasted

Examples:

-All of Erick’s work went down the drain when his computer was stolen out of his car. He lost all of his files.

-All of her work went down the drain when she lost her job.

4-

Idiom: down and out

Meaning: have no money/have no support

Examples:

-Michelle was down and out after her house burned down.

-The Smiths were on the down and out after they moved to Milwaukee and couldn’t find jobs.

Animal Idioms

1-

Idiom: monkey see, monkey do

Meaning: copy; mimic

Example:

-Stop copying me! Monkey see. Monkey do.

2-

Idiom: monkey business

Meaning: playing around; now following the rules or laws

Examples:

-Stop this monkey business right now! Or you might break something.

-This monkey business has gone too far! You better start listening to your parents or you will have to go on time out.

3-

Idiom: I smell a rat.

Meaning: feel that something is wrong; someone saying something about you

Example:

-I wonder how she knew I said that.- I smell a rat.

4-

Idiom: rat you out

Meaning: tell on you; to reveal incriminating or embarrassing information about someone

Example:

-She ratted out she brother after he robbed someone.

-The journalist ratted out all of the politicians that were involved in a money laundering ring.

5-

Idiom: rat race

Meaning: keeps you busy with doing much meaningful

Example:

-I am stuck in the rat race.

-I finally got out of the rat race when I started my own business online.

6-

Idiom: pig out

Meaning: eat a lot of food in a short amount of time

Examples:

-My grandpa pigged out at the buffet.

-I pigged out at Jonathan’s birthday Party. The food was great.

7-

Idiom: hog something

Meaning: don’t share/take up

Examples:

-Stop hogging the toys. I want to play too.

-Don’t hog the bread. I want some too.

8-

Idiom: dog eat dog world

Meaning: a situation where it is very competitive and you will do anything to get

Ahead / excel / survive

Example:

-The acting scene in Los Angeles is a dog eat dog world- many people will do anything to get cast in a movie.

9-

Idiom: when pigs fly

Meaning: never

Examples:

-I will call him back when pigs fly.

-I hate sea food. I will eat it when pigs fly.

10-

Idiom: crocodile tears

Meaning: fake tears or crying; pretend to be upset

Examples:

-My daughter pretended to be upset when school was cancelled but it was really crocodile tears.

-The boy sheds a lot of crocodile tears to see if his mom gives him what he wants in the store.

11-

Idiom: smell something fishy

Meaning: to seem suspicious

Examples:

-I smell something fishy. I think that man is up to no good.

- Something about the real estate deal seemed odd. I decided to call if off because something smelled fishy.

12-

Idiom: take the bull by the horns

Meaning: to deal with or confront a problem head-on/publicly

Examples:

-After I found out my wife was cheating on me; I took the bull by the horns and called a divorce attorney.

-It’s time to take the bull by the horns and complete this project before it is too late.

13-

Idiom: let the cat out of the bag

Meaning: to accidently reveal a secret

Examples:

-My sister let the cat out of the bag when she mentioned I was pregnant. I hadn’t told anyone else the news yet.

-Kim let the cat out of the bag when she accidently told Mark about his surprise party.

Cat Idioms

1-

Idiom: copycat

Meaning: someone that copies another person or thing

Examples:

-She is a copycat. If I wear by hair a certain way; she does too.

-People need to think of their own songs and stop being copycats.

2-

Idiom: raining cats and dogs

Meaning: pouring rain, raining very hard

Example:

-I thought it was supposed to be nice out today but now it’s raining cats and dogs.

3-

Idiom: cats got your tongue

Meaning: someone who is having a difficult speaking, or someone who is shy and doesn’t want to speak or respond

Example:

-What happened? The cat’s got your tongue?

4-

Idiom: cat nap

Meaning: short nap or sleep

Examples:

-I am going to take a quick cat nap before I make dinner.

-The baby never seems to sleep for a long time. He takes cat naps all day long.

5-

Idiom: curiosity killed the cat

Meaning: being curious can get you into trouble

Example:

-Stop trying to read his messages- remember curiosity killed the cat.

Idioms about Sports

1-

Idiom: ahead of the pack

Meaning: in front of the rest in the group

Example:

-Marcela ran ahead of the pack and won the race.

-Jeffrey started slow but sprinted the last leg of the race and got ahead of the pack.

2-

Idiom: cover all the bases

Meaning: detailed; doesn’t forget anything

Examples:

-I need to cover all the bases and make sure all the team members completed their part of the project.

- The marketing presentation is very detailed. I think we have covered all of the bases.

3-

Idiom: jump the gun

Meaning: start before you are supposed, start/do something too early/quickly

Examples:

-He jumped the gun and started repairing his house the same day he bought it.

- I guess I jumped the gun when I bought Mary a gift for her baby when I found out she was pregnant. I gave her a pink outfit for the baby and she just found out she is having a boy.

4-

Idiom: on the mark

Meaning: correct

Examples:

-Her speech was on the mark.

- His bid for cleaning services was on the mark. We hired his company to start cleaning our office next week.

5-

Idiom: out of left field

Meaning: comes out of nowhere; a complete surprise

Examples:

-My resignation came from out of left field. My boss was very surprised.

- My sister’s outburst came out of left field. I never knew she was so passionate about global warming.

6-

Idiom: learn the ropes

Meaning: learn new things; learn new process

Examples:

-I spent my first week in my new position learning the ropes.

- You have to learn the ropes of our advertising business if you want to land your first big client.

7-

Idiom: on the ball

Meaning: ready and able; proactive

Examples:

-Your new assistant is on the ball. She got back to me really quick with the information I requested.

- It’s important to be on the ball when turning in your homework. You would hate for the teacher to give you an incomplete.

8-

Idiom: take a rain check

Meaning: accept at a later time

Examples:

-Thanks for the invitation but I’m going to take a rain check. I already have plans that day.

-Sounds interesting but I’m going to take a rain check. Have a great time.

9-

Idiom: under the table

Meaning: illegally

Examples:

-He is always doing business under the table so he doesn’t have to pay taxes.

-The dishwasher doesn’t have papers to work so he has to be paid under the table.

Idioms about Expressing Emotions

1-

Idiom: blew my top

Meaning: very angry or irate

Example:

-Ms. Peterson blew her top when the new cleaning lady smashed an expensive vase.

-I blew my top when I found out that the concert tickets were already sold out.

2-

Idiom: throw a fit

Meaning: very angry

Examples:

-My five year old daughter threw a fit when her favourite movie ended.

-I am going to throw a fit if they don’t serve our food soon. I’m starving!

3-

Idiom: sick and tired

Meaning: very frustrated, very annoyed

Examples:

-I’m sick and tired of your attitude.

-I’m sick and tired of how you treat your mother. Why don’t you be a little nicer? She is trying to help you out.

4-

Idiom: giving the cold shoulder

Meaning: avoid someone, ignore someone

Example:

-She gave me the cold shoulder at the wedding and pretended she didn’t even see me.

- He gave me the cold shoulder all afternoon and refused to speak to me.

5-

Idiom: worried sick

Meaning: very anxious, almost panic stricken

Example:

-I was worried sick about you. Why didn’t you answer your phone?

-Amy was worried sick about her daughter after she didn’t come home at her curfew.

6-

Idiom: bored to death

Meaning: extremely bored

Example:

-I was bored to death during the economics lecture.

-I went to a science fiction movie with my brother and I was bored to death. It was not my type of film.

7-

Idiom: Keep your fingers crossed

Meaning: wishing for something to come true

Examples:

-I kept my fingers crossed as they were calling of the names of the people that won prizes.

-Keep your fingers crossed that I get this job.

Food Idioms

1-

Idiom: Easy as pie

Meaning: something was simple or easy

Examples:

-The math homework was easy as pie.

-That was easy as pie!

2-

Idiom: piece of cake

Meaning: something was simple or easy

Examples:

-The biology exam was a piece of cake. I didn’t even have to study.

-That was a piece of cake! It only took five minutes.

3-

Idiom: icing on the cake

Meaning: something extra special happens on top of something else good

Example:

-To put icing on the cake, she made a delicious dessert to eat after the homemade meal.

-I got the job and to put icing on the cake; they offered to pay me even more than I asked for!

4-

Idiom: chew out

Meaning: scold/yell someone

Example:

-My teacher chewed me out for not turning in my homework all week long.

-My grandma chewed me out for watching too much TV.

5-

Idiom: spill the beans

Meaning: to disclose or tell a secret

Examples:

-I know you know what happened; spill the beans!

- Spill the beans and tell me what she said.

6-

Idiom: sour grapes

Meaning: refers to an attitude in which someone has a negative attitude about something because they cannot have it themselves.

Examples:

-The principal ignored the complaints about a new teacher as sour grapes.

-The teacher dismissed the student’s complaints as sour grapes. Next time they would have to study harder for the exam.

 

Idioms explained and with examples

Click here to download the PDF on idioms 

Click here to download the PDF on idioms

 

Joomla SEF URLs by Artio